Borealis Press logo
Borealis Press Home | Index by Author | Index by Title | Search | View Cart

Colonial Era

Confederation Era

Modern Era

eBooks

Children

Young Adult

Novels

General Works

Drama

Poetry

Criticism and Biography/Autobiography

Canadian Critical Editions

Journal of Canadian Poetry

Native

Heritage Books of Canada

How Parliament Works

Canadian Parliamentary Handbook

Fiction

Short Stories

Prose

Canadian Writers

Multi-Cultural

Early Canadian Woman Writers

Canadian Native Subjects

History

Medicine

Abuse of Power

Aussie Six

Canadian Critical Edition

Early Canadian Women Writers Series

Greenhouse Kids

Hockey Family

Journal of Canadian Poetry

Mighty Orion

New Canadian Drama

Other Side

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry

Quickbeam Chronicles

René

Silly Sally

Tales of the Shining Mountains

The Stry-Ker Family Saga

Trudzik

Canadian Critical Edition
 
The Mountain and the Valley

Edited by
Marta Dvorak


Cover of The Mountain and the Valley
518 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133904
$19.95 CA



About the Book

The Mountain and the Valley was published the same year and to as much acclaim as Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea and Steinbeck's East of Eden. Set in the early decades of the 20th century in the poor farming communities of Nova Scotia, Buckler's first novel stages a collision between two worlds. Buckler has been hailed as a "pioneer in Canadian writing" and a "pathbreaker for the modern Canadian novel" (Laurence and Atwood). But this edition breaks new ground by engaging with the author's relation to international currents and the novel's place on the international scene. The Mountain and the Valley is grounded in the local, but addresses questions of central/peripheral positioning which are identifiable in the "new" literatures of the post-colonial world as a characteristic anxiety of ex-imperial societies. The novel moreover reflects the philosophical interrogations of modernity transcending national boundaries. These questions involve a suspicion of an increasingly technologized and knowledge-based society, the problematic relations of the self with a reality which is arguably only a construction, and even the issue of how representation mediates our access to reality. Entering into a diachronic dialogue with writers and thinkers throughout the globe, from Emerson and Thomas Hardy to T.S. Eliot and Sartre, the novel illustrates not only the evolutions and loops in North American production, but also the overlapping of dominant and later, peripheral modernisms.

This edition buttresses the fresh view of Buckler's novel by providing a fuller version of the text than is available with the reprinted McClelland and Stewart NCL edition. It notably confronts the original American Henry Holt edition (1952) with Buckler's final typescript, in the interests of furthering textual authenticity and legitimacy. The significant variants are addressed and certain cuts in the text are restored. The Textual appendix endnotes not only comment on the modifications and criteria (ranging from commercial reasons to ethical or aesthetic ones), but also make certain passages which are not restored within the body of the text accessible to a specialized readership. The restored segments either illuminate culture-specific practices, or connect with modernist or authorial preoccupations and techniques.

This edition's multi-faceted explanatory notes also go beyond the traditional mandate of the genre. They innovate by engaging with aesthetic and philosophical considerations as well as historical, regional, and cultural issues. The abundant in-depth notes are complemented by Background/Context section, a biographical essay by Gwendolyn Davies, and a Criticism section which privileges recent publications and new scholarship. It contains reprints of landmark articles by Stephen Ross and Maia Bhojwani, but also contains a revisiting by Glenn Willmott of a former article to which he writes a response. It also provides essays commissioned especially for this book. Medrie Purdham's essay addressing the transtextual dialogism with Proust and the broader connections with an international literature of jealousy, and Travis Mason's fresh bioregional, ecocritical reading provide new insights.


In the Village of Viger

Written by
Duncan Campbell Scott
Edited by
Robert G May


Cover of In the Village of Viger
319 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133768
$19.95 CA





319 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133782
$39.95 CA



About the Book

Originally published in 1896, In the Village of Viger was Duncan Campbell Scott's inaugural collection of short stories. Focusing on the daily lives and vicissitudes of the people in a small Quebec town at the turn of the century, In the Village of Viger has been hailed as a sensitive and realistic evocation of Canadian rural life. By deftly creating a system of themes, motifs, charecters, and symbols, that recur, throughout the closely interlinked short stories, In the Village of Viger anticipates other Canadian short-story cycles such as Stephen Leacock's Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town.


Over Prairie Trails

Written by
Frederick Philip Grove
Edited by
Alison Calder


Cover of Over Prairie Trails
201 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133829
$19.95 CA





201 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133805
$39.95 CA



About the Book

Over Prairie Trails is Fredrick Philip Grove's best-loved work. A series of autpbiographical nature sketches, this collections depicts a prairie landscape on the cusp of modernity and about to be forever transformed by new technologies. Grove's keen eye and imaginative musings create an important document in Canadian ecological history. Equally important in the process of Grove's self-creation, as he strives to make his narrator plausible despite his own assumed identity. Grove's description of his narrator's trials, triumphs, and failures as he navigates a difficult prairie landscape in summer and winter provides insight into social circumstances on the prairies in the 1920s. His narrator's devotion to wife and child, admirable yet problematic, animates the book's trajectory. Through bnoth detailed natural observations and outright flights of fancy, Over Prairie Trails captures one man's response to a landscape and social structure on the brink of tremendous change.


Crowded Out!: and Other Sketches

Written by
Susan Frances Harrison
Edited by
Tracy Ware


Cover of Crowded Out!
314 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133720
$19.95 CA





314 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133744
$39.95 CA



About the Book

In 1886, Susan Frances Harrison published a collection of eleven stories with the Ottawa Evening Journal. Some of the stories are as topical as the North-West Rebellion of the year before, while others take an ironic perspective on the vogue for local colour, especially in French Canada. The book begins with a Canadian artist's dissapointment and breakdown in London, where he has been unable to markey his work. It ends by anticipating Stephen Leacock's Arcadian Adventures of the Idle Rich with a mordant look at the lives of the wealthy in New York City. As the reviewer in the New York Critic observes,"One hardly knows which element predominates- the picturesque, the humerous, the imaginative, or the realistic. This edition features explanatory notes based on Harrison's marginalia. It includes a bibliography, contemporary reviews from "The Week" and "Critic", a selection of Harrison's nonfiction, a biographical essay by Carrie MacMillan, and critical essays by Margaret Steffler, Jennifer Chambers, Wanda Campbell, and Shelly Hulan.


Sister Woman

Written by
Jessie Georgina Sime
Edited by
Sandra Campbell



295 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133416
$19.95 CA





295 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133393
$19.95 CA



About the Book

A rediscovered classic, J.G. Sime´s Sister Woman, originally published in 1919, is a pioneering book of short stories, focused on the social and sexual changes in women's lives underway in the early twentieth century. Set in the Montreal of World War I, the twenty-eight stories deal with the lives of middle and lower-class women with a frankness that startled Sime's contemporaries. Sime´s characters—seamstresses, munitions workers, secretaries, cooks, charwomen and prostitutes — struggle with issues of sexuality, maternity and work, amid the immigration, urbanization and industrialization underway in the Canada of the day. Georgina Sime, herself an immigrant to Canada, used her short story cycle — interrelated stories about the "Woman's and the Man's Question" — to examine issues of gender, class, ethnicity and place and their impact on the lives of the women of her day. As a result, Sister Woman is a work of short fiction significant not only to Canadian literature, but to Canadian history and women's studies. The following writers contributed to this critical edition of Sister Woman: Sandra Campbell, Misao Dean, Peter Donovan, Gerald Lynch, Ann Martin, Lindsey McMaster, and K. Jane Watt. Sandra Campbell, co-editor of Pioneering Women, Aspiring Women and New Women, three anthologies of short fiction by Canadian women to 1920, is currently completing a biography of Lorne Pierce, editor of Ryerson Press, 1920-1960. She teaches in the Pauline Jewett Institute of Women´s Studies, Carleton University. She is General Editor of Tecumseh´s Early Canadian Women Writers Series.


Animal Stories

Written by
Charles G. D. Roberts
Edited by
Terry Whalen


Cover of Animal Stories
333 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133485
$19.95 CA





333 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133508
$39.95 CA



About the Book

This edition of Stories recovers what its editor sees as twenty of his finest works. Along with Ernest Thompson Seton, Roberts was the co-founder of the modern 'realistic' animal story. Misao Dean, Joseph Gold, W. J. Keith, T. D. MacLulich, and Terry Whalen contributed to the Criticism section. There is a short biography, anonymous reviews, commentaries on animals and the animal story by Roberts, and an extensive bibliography.


Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich

Written by
Stephen Leacock
Edited by
D M. R. Bentley


Cover of Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich
268 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133331
$19.95 CA





268 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133317
$39.95 CA



About the Book

"CHEER UP, EVERYBODY." With these words and the following note Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich was introduced by its publisher to readers of the November 18, 1914 issue of The New York Times Book Review: Stephen Leacock is a humorist who puts big ideas into satire and fun. These delicious adventures take us into the realm of financiers, American clubmen and clubwomen, and the magnificent homes of the wealthy, and literally bubble over with wit and farcical satire. A week later (and perhaps at Leacock´s request) the last phrase of this advertisement was changed to "good-natured fun," and a week later again, Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich was included among the Review´s "Two Hundred Leading Books of the Season," where it was "classed with" Leacock´s Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town, and credited with "great clearness . . . the utmost good nature" and an "apparently . . . spontaneous" manner of bringing out "the humor of personalities and incidents . . . ." None of these qualities has diminished in their appeal or effectiveness and none of the targets of Leacock´s "farcical satire" and "good-natured fun" has either disappeared or become less needful of critique: Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich is as funny and pertinent today as it was in 1914. So long as there is a "realm of financiers," Leacock´s humour will remain a "delicious" reminder of what is truly valuable in life.


Swamp Angel

Written by
Ethel Wilson
Edited by
Li-Ping Geng


Cover of Swamp Angel
283 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133515
$19.95 CA





283 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133560
$39.95 CA



About the Book

   Swamp Angel was first published in 1954 and eventually became a Canadian classic. The novel and its heroine, Maggie Lloyd, played a part in inspiring such other classics as Margaret Laurence´s The Stone Angel and Carol Shields´ The Stone Diaries. Ethel Wilson´s lucidly spare and elegant prose tells a wonderfully crafted tale of jealousy, loyalty, and deliverance, at once regional and universal, realistic and philosophical. The story engages with themes of family, marriage, love, nature, religion, race, compassion, independence, and, above all, human understanding. Wilson´s masterful descriptions of the green world of the British Columbia interior continue to contribute much to the reader´s pleasure. As George Woodcock observed, "No other writer has more successfully evoked British Columbia as a place or its inhabitants as a strange and unique people than Ethel Wilson."
   The following writers contribute to this edition of Swamp Angel: Anjali Bhelande, Burke Cullen, Li-Ping Geng, Janet Giltrow, John Gray, W. J. Keith, and David Stouck.
   Li-Ping Geng is the editor of James Austen´s The Loiterer (2000) and The Novels of Henry Mackenzie (2005). He has taught English at universities in China and Canada, and is the Dean of the School of Foreign Languages at Yan Tai University.


Early Canadian Short Stories

Edited by
Misao Dean


Cover of Early Canadian Short Stories
358 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133157
$19.95 CA





358 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133133
$39.95 CA



About the Book

This collection of short stories written in Canada before the end of WWI navigates between the extremes of commercial fiction and "serious literature," and between the canonically sanctioned and the marginalized, in order to be at once historically representative, inclusive, and open to a variety of critical approaches. It includes works by well-known authors such as Thomas Chandler Haliburton, Charles G. D. Roberts, and Stephen Leacock, as well as lesser-known writers (such as the Chinese-Canadian Edith Eaton) and many such as Gilbert Parker and E. W. Thomson who have become less popular in the last thirty years. It places a variety of popular forms, including the detective story and the wilderness adventure, alongside serious stories of psychological realism, spiritual renewal, and political advocacy. These stories are just plain great reading, especially for those interested in Canada and our history as Canadians. They offer a chance to laugh with Pauline Johnson at the stereotype of the "Indian Princess," to experience "camping out" in Muskoka in 1886, and to lament, with J. MacDonald Oxley, the US domination of the Canadian literary market. They also offer students the opportunity to discuss some of the most interesting issues in current literary studies: the ways that genre encodes cultural assumptions; the construction of gender in early Canada; the ways that Canadians have understood themselves as members of a national community, and the ways this community has constructed its racialized "other." They invite readers to rethink what Canada is, and imagine what it might be in the future. This critical edition includes contributions from these Canadian writers: Frank Davey, W. H. New, James Doyle, Mary Louise Pratt, Stephen Scobie, and Daniel Francis.


Imperialist

Written by
Sara Jeannette Duncan
Edited by
Thomas E. Tausky


Cover of Imperialist
488 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133386
$19.95 CA





488 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133171
$39.95 CA



About the Book

Duncan´s novel The Imperialist is about an adolescent nation seeking to define its own identity, "We are at the making of a nation": the narrator tells us at one point. Lorne Murchison, the imperialist of the title, thinks Canada is at a crucial moment in her political destiny, and seeks ardently to convert others to his vision of Canada as a leading force in an imperial partnership. In the small Ontario city of Elgin, obsessed with politics at all times, tensions mount as a hard-fought by-election takes place. As Lorne says in his fiery concluding speech, "The question that underlies this decision for Canada is that of the whole stamp and character of her future existence." When asked by the Globe and Mail "What book would you recommend to a foreigner who wants to understand Canada," Carol Shields picked The Imperialist: "It deals with how Canadians think in the moderate sense of being Canadian. What it means to be liberal, for example. Having been written during the early part of the century, you wouldn´t have thought The Imperialist would have been so prophetic. Her book is charming as well as intelligent." This edition includes extensive explanatory notes and the complete texts of Duncan´s letters about The Imperialist. Reprints essays or extracts from published books by: Peter Allen, Carl Berger, Carole Gerson, Ajay Heble, Michael Peterman, Clara Thomas, and Francis Zichy; as well as essays written specifically for it by: Terrence L. Craig, Frank Davey, Teresa Hubel, Elisabeth Köster, and Thomas E. Tausky


Northern Romanticism: Poets of the Confederation

Edited by
Tracy Ware


Cover of Northern Romanticism: Poets of the Confederation
528 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133195
$19.95 CA





528 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133171
$39.95 CA



About the Book

Around 1880, the writers in this anthology began to write poetry of a calibre not seen before in Canada. Both Isabella Valancy Crawford and William Wilfred Campbell soon emerged as distinctive voices, but Charles G. D. Roberts played the vital role. His early poetry showed the possibilities of a Canadian Romanticism to Archibald Lampman, Bliss Carman, and Duncan Campbell Scott. By the end of the century, Campbell had launched an attack on Carman that disrupted the earlier harmony of the group, and the deaths of Crawford in 1887 and Lampman in 1899 marked the end of an era. The four surviving poets would remain active for some time, but the last two decades of the nineteenth century were the great years for the Confederation poets. A Northern Romanticism includes such familiar lyrics as Roberts´ "The Tantramar Revisited," Lampman´s "Among the Timothy," and Scott´s "The Height of Land," and lesser-known works such as Crawford´s "Gisli: the Chieftain," Roberts´ New York Nocturnes (1998), and Carman´s Sappho lyrics (1905). This anthology features introductions to each poet, bibliographies, and explanatory notes as well as essays from Charles G. D. Roberts, Archibald Lampman, Bliss Carman, Duncan Campbell Scott, E. K. Brown, R. E. Rashley, Malcolm Ross, Germaine Warkentin, D.M.R. Bentley, Stan Dragland, and Susan Glickman. Tracy Ware is the editor of Levi Adams´ Jean Baptiste (Canadian Poetry Press) and the author of articles on Shelley, Wordsworth, Poe, Naipaul, Keneally, and various aspects of Canadian literature. He teaches English at Queen´s University.


Roughing It in the Bush; or, Life in Canada

Written by
Susanna Moodie
Edited by
Elizabeth Helen Thompson


Cover of Roughing It in the Bush; or, Life in Canada
534 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133447
$19.95 CA





534 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133423
$19.95 CA



About the Book

Susanna Moodie´s Roughing It in the Bush has inspired controversy since its first publication in 1852. Readers tend to react strongly to the book and its author, and critics continue to debate its merits and idiosyncrasies with respect to form, genre, them and motifs, as well as characterization - with special emphasis on Moodie´s depiction of herself. Although ostensibly a book about one middle-class English woman´s experiences in pioneer Upper Canada during the 1830´s, Roughing It has been variously labelled history, fiction, autobiography, travel literature. What cannot be debated, however, is that this is Susanna Moodie´s one great work; her novels are cliché-ridden, romantic fiction, and the only other Canadian non-fiction, Life in the Clearings, set as it is at a later stage of settlement, lacks the emotional intensity generated by the account of an emigrant´s first exposure to Canada and documented so graphically in Roughing It in the Bush. This new edition of Roughing It in the Bush provides a reliable primary text, a new biography, documents that help contextualize various aspects of the book, and a selection of critical commentary from the following: Margaret Atwood, Charles Frederick Briggs, Carl Ballstadt, D.M.R. Bentley, Marian Fowler, Blanche Hume, Carl Klinck, Thomas Guthrie Marquis, Michael Peterman, Carol Shields, David Stouck.


Wacousta

Written by
John Richardson
Edited by
John Moss


Cover of Wacousta
555 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133072
$19.95 CA





554 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133058
$39.95 CA



About the Book

John Richardson´s wondrously extravagant frontier romance, Wacousta, was first published in 1832. Since then it has been applauded, ignored, restored again to critical favour and celebrated as a national treasure. Yet it is a novel to be appreciated rather than revered. Too much solemnity might obscure the exuberant recklessness of the text, the blood-chilling bravado of the author´s achievement. The genius of Wacousta is that it invites all manner of critical speculation yet refuses to submit to any one construct or approach. Wacousta is not a meditation. It is a gothic tale of dishonour, revenge and enduring passion, of horror, terror and moral perversity, of weird sexuality and bizarre violence. For all of that, it is a profoundly Canadian novel, written by a man who, with only slight exaggeration, describes himself as our first native-born novelist, published years before Canada became a nation. In this volume, comprehensive biographical and bibliographical information is provided; and the pleasures of an authoritative text are reflected in the insights, enthusiasms and illuminating explications in a wide range of critical commentary by the following: Carl Ballstadt, David R. Beasley, A.C. Casselman, Douglas Daymond, Dennis Duffy, Carole Gerson, Michael Hurley, Manina Jones, Carl Klinck, Robert Lecker, Gaile McGregor, Leslie Monkman, John Moss, Margot Northerly, James Reaney, and William Riddell.


History of Emily Montague

Written by
Frances Brooke



500 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133294
$24.95 CA





500 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133270
$39.95 CA



About the Book

The beauty of Frances Brooke´s The History of Emily Montague is that it can be read both as a novel of sensibility with a sentimental love story and as a highly politicized depiction of life in eighteenth-century Quebec. It has much to say about confrontations between the Old World and the New, Huron and Iroquois cultures, and progressive gender roles. First published in 1769 and often considered the "first" Canadian novel, it has an enchanting cast of characters: the modest heroine, the dashing colonial hero, the witty coquette, the waggish soldier, the unrequited lover, and the wise father. Recently, The History of Emily Montague has been received as a feminist text with Brooke participating in a critique of rituals of courtship, "petticoat politics," and fashionable "propriety." It has been newly appreciated for its use of the epistolary form representing multiple narrative voices and it has been read as a precursor to the regionalist novels of Canada. Any way you read it, though, the novel is still able to instruct and delight. This critical edition of Brooke´s novel provides a new bibliography, excerpts from Brooke´s other works, a full biography of Brooke, and a selection of critical commentary spanning early responses to the novel to contemporary readings from the following: Barbara Benedict, Ida Burwash, Charles Blue, Carl Klinck, Frederick Philip Grove, Dermot McCarthy, Juliet McMaster, Lorraine McMullen, Robert Merrett, Ann Messenger, W.H. New, Desmond Pacey, E. Phillips Poole, Katherine M. Rogers, and Jane Spencer. Also included are four essays written especially for this edition by Cecily Devereux, Faye Hammill, Laura Moss, and Pam Perkins. Laura Moss teaches Canadian literature, World Literature Written in English, and postcolonial theory at the University of British Columbia. She is the author of articles on authors ranging from Chinua Achebe to Zoe Wicomb and is on the editorial board of Ariel: A Review of International English Literature.


Settlers of the Marsh

Written by
Frederick Philip Grove
Edited by
Alison Calder



331 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133522
$19.95 CA





331 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133546
$39.95 CA



About the Book

When Frederick Philip Grove´s novel Settlers of the Marsh was published in 1925, it produced controversy and scandal. Grove´s frank treatment of sexuality and his unflinching look at the rigours of settler life provide searing insights into the dynamics of an imagined settler community. The story of the Swedish immigrant Niels Lindstedt and the two very different women who vie for his affections not only enthralls readers with its violence and drama, but also illuminates contemporary social attitudes and mores. The novel, steeped in a European tradition and sensibility, moves beyond a prairie setting to address cosmopolitan aesthetic issues as well as regional ones. Niels´s attempts to come to terms with his new land and community, and the painful toll that these attempts take on him, open a window into settler immigrant experiences. More recently, readers have turned to the characterizations of Clara, the "gay widow," and Ellen, the hardworking, asexual farm woman, to understand the social and political forces at work on women´s lives. The discovery in the 1970s that Grove´s autobiography, the Governor General´s Award-winning In Search of Myself, was largely fictional and, more recently, the discovery that his early life included a secret marriage to an unconventional woman, led readers to reconsider Grove´s treatment of marriage in this novel. As this edition shows, readers continue to discover new and fascinating aspects of Settlers. This critical edition of Grove´s novel provides representative reviews from the time of its publication, a literary biography detailing the complicated life of its author, and a range of critical commentary from the following: Desmond Pacey, Laurie Ricou, Lorraine McMullen, Dick Harrison, Camille La Bossière, Robert Kroetsch, David Williams, Irene Gammel, Smaro Kamboureli, Klaus Martens, and Paul Morris. Also included are two essays written especially for this edition by Christian Riegel and Alison Calder. Alison Calder is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Manitoba, where she teaches Canadian literature and creative writing. She has published numerous articles on prairie literature and culture, and is the editor of Desire Never Leaves: The Poetry of Tim Lilburn and the co-editor of History, Literature, and the Writing of the Canadian Prairies. She is the 2004 winner of the Bronwen Wallace Memorial Prize for poetry, and her upcoming poetry book is Wolf Tree.


History of Emily Montague

Written by
Frances Brooke


Cover of History of Emily Montague
500 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133294
$24.95 CA





500 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133270
$39.95 CA



About the Book

   The beauty of Frances Brooke´s The History of Emily Montague is that it can be read both as a novel of sensibility with a sentimental love story and as a highly politicized depiction of life in eighteenth-century Quebec. It has much to say about confrontations between the Old World and the New, Huron and Iroquois cultures, and progressive gender roles. First published in 1769 and often considered the "first" Canadian novel, it has an enchanting cast of characters: the modest heroine, the dashing colonial hero, the witty coquette, the waggish soldier, the unrequited lover, and the wise father. Recently, The History of Emily Montague has been received as a feminist text with Brooke participating in a critique of rituals of courtship, "petticoat politics," and fashionable "propriety." It has been newly appreciated for its use of the epistolary form representing multiple narrative voices and it has been read as a precursor to the regionalist novels of Canada. Any way you read it, though, the novel is still able to instruct and delight.
   This critical edition of Brooke´s novel provides a new bibliography, excerpts from Brooke´s other works, a full biography of Brooke, and a selection of critical commentary spanning early responses to the novel to contemporary readings from the following: Barbara Benedict, Ida Burwash, Charles Blue, Carl Klinck, Frederick Philip Grove, Dermot McCarthy, Juliet McMaster, Lorraine McMullen, Robert Merrett, Ann Messenger, W.H. New, Desmond Pacey, E. Phillips Poole, Katherine M. Rogers, and Jane Spencer. Also included are four essays written especially for this edition by Cecily Devereux, Faye Hammill, Laura Moss, and Pam Perkins.


Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town

Written by
Stephen Leacock
Edited by
Gerald Lynch


Cover of Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town
225 pages, Paperback
ISBN: 9781896133348
$19.95 CA





225 pages, Hardcover
ISBN: 9781896133324
$24.95 CA



About the Book


E-mail:drt@borealispress.com
Post: 8 Mohawk Crescent, Nepean, Ontario, Canada, K2H 7G6
Telephone: (613) 829-0150
Facsimile: (613) 829-7783
Toll Free: (877) 829-9989

top home